Arts Entrepreneurs http://www.artsentrepreneurs.com Stories and Lessons on the Business of Art Fri, 17 Jul 2015 09:43:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Arts Entrepreneurs is a podcast and website where artists help each other by telling their stories and sharing what they've learned about the business of art. Host and producer Philip Graulty interviews artists, entrepreneurs and changemakers who are using art and culture to shape the future of our neighborhoods and our world. Through intimate conversations and the occasional vignette, Arts Entrepreneurs aims to celebrate artists who are doing remarkable things while empowering others to follow suit. www.artsentrepreneurs.com Philip Graulty clean Philip Graulty pgraulty@gmail.com pgraulty@gmail.com (Philip Graulty) © 2015 Arts Entrepreneurs Stories and Lessons on the Business of Art Arts Entrepreneurs /dev/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/ae-podcast-cover-art-300.jpg http://www.artsentrepreneurs.com TV-G Los Angeles, CA Weekly 013: Shakespeare in Detroit /013-shakespeare-in-detroit/ /013-shakespeare-in-detroit/#comments Fri, 17 Jul 2015 09:43:27 +0000 /?p=1094

On this episode, we talk with Sam to hear how a seedling of an idea became Shakespeare in Detroit, one of the city’s most celebrated theater companies and talked-about startup ventures.

Links and Resources

Sam White Talks Shakespeare in Detroit

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Image: Sam White

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/013-shakespeare-in-detroit/feed/ 0 When theater actor Sam White left her hometown of Detroit to pursue a career in Las Vegas, she ended up discovering something unexpected in the middle of the desert -- an idea to start her very own Shakespeare company. - On this episode, When theater actor Sam White left her hometown of Detroit to pursue a career in Las Vegas, she ended up discovering something unexpected in the middle of the desert -- an idea to start her very own Shakespeare company. On this episode, we talk with Sam to hear how a seedling of an idea became Shakespeare in Detroit (http://shakespeareindetroit.com), one of the city's most celebrated theater companies and talked-about startup ventures. Links and Resources * Shakespeare in Detroit (http://shakespeareindetroit.com), the city's official Shakespeare company. * Sam White (http://www.detroitsamwhite.com/), founder and artistic director of Shakespeare in Detroit. * Waxxelerated (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Willbe/Waxxalereted), the album by French hip-hop composer Willbe. Sam White Talks Shakespeare in Detroit ### Image: Sam White (http://www.detroitsamwhite.com/) Philip Graulty clean 45:49
012: Short: See You Soon /see-you-soon/ /see-you-soon/#comments Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:13:45 +0000 /?p=1026 Today’s show concludes Season One of the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast. Yes, we have seasons! Who would have thought?

Season Two starts Thursday, May 21, 2015, but in the meantime, please stay connected. Subscribe on iTunes, follow Arts Entrepreneurs on Facebook, or follow me, Philip Graulty on Twitter. Say hello. I’d love to hear from you!

Last but not least, Friday, April 17, 2015, 7:00pm PST is the end of our crowdfunding campaign. So far, we’ve raised over $2,500, but if we can push that even further, that would be amazing!

If you’ve gotten anything from this show, if it has helped you in anyway, or if you simply want show your support, please consider making a contribution. Every little bit helps. Thank you.

Donate: artsentrepreneurs.com/support

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/see-you-soon/feed/ 0 Today's show concludes Season One of the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast. Yes, we have seasons! Who would have thought? - Season Two starts Thursday, May 21, 2015, but in the meantime, please stay connected. Subscribe on iTunes, Today's show concludes Season One of the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast. Yes, we have seasons! Who would have thought? Season Two starts Thursday, May 21, 2015, but in the meantime, please stay connected. Subscribe on iTunes (/itunes), follow Arts Entrepreneurs on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/artsentrepreneurs), or follow me, Philip Graulty on Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/philipgraulty). Say hello. I'd love to hear from you! Last but not least, Friday, April 17, 2015, 7:00pm PST is the end of our crowdfunding campaign. So far, we've raised over $2,500, but if we can push that even further, that would be amazing! If you've gotten anything from this show, if it has helped you in anyway, or if you simply want show your support, please consider making a contribution. Every little bit helps. Thank you. Donate: artsentrepreneurs.com/support (/support) Philip Graulty clean 5:09
11: John Schneider: Winning a Grammy on the Fringe /john-schneider-winning-a-grammy-on-the-fringe/ /john-schneider-winning-a-grammy-on-the-fringe/#comments Thu, 02 Apr 2015 09:32:27 +0000 /?p=1008

John’s fascination with microtonal music has led him to do some pretty remarkable things — directing an annual music festival, starting his own record label, building his own instruments, and most recently, giving an acceptance speech at the 57th Grammy Awards Ceremony.

On this episode, we retrace the steps of John Schneider’s career to find out how one guitarist’s obsession with an obscure composer’s music ultimately led to a winning seat at the Grammys.

John Schneider: Winning a Grammy on the Fringe

Links and Resources

  • Microfest, the world’s premier festival of microtonal music.
  • Partch, the Grammy winning ensemble that specializes in the music and instruments of the iconoclastic American Maverick composer Harry Partch.

The Music of Harry Partch: Plectra and Percussion Dances

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/john-schneider-winning-a-grammy-on-the-fringe/feed/ 0 For the past three decades, guitarist John Schneider has performed almost exclusively on the fringe, leaving the standard classical repertoire behind in search for music in between the notes. While most would consider this path "career suicide, For the past three decades, guitarist John Schneider has performed almost exclusively on the fringe, leaving the standard classical repertoire behind in search for music in between the notes. While most would consider this path "career suicide," the further John veered off-course, the more opportunities came his way. John's fascination with microtonal music has led him to do some pretty remarkable things -- directing an annual music festival, starting his own record label, building his own instruments, and most recently, giving an acceptance speech at the 57th Grammy Awards Ceremony. On this episode, we retrace the steps of John Schneider's career to find out how one guitarist's obsession with an obscure composer's music ultimately led to a winning seat at the Grammys. (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/john-schneider-partch-2.jpg) Links and Resources * Microfest (http://microfest.org/), the world’s premier festival of microtonal music. * Partch (http://microfest.org/about-partch/), the Grammy winning ensemble that specializes in the music and instruments of the iconoclastic American Maverick composer Harry Partch. The Music of Harry Partch: Plectra and Percussion Dances Philip Graulty clean 29:31
Ten Lessons I’ve Learned From My First Ten Guests /ten-lessons-ten-guests/ /ten-lessons-ten-guests/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 11:27:45 +0000 /?p=998

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How to prioritize success.
  • How to find the sweet spot between your own passions and other people’s needs.
  • Why it’s important to look outside of your industry for inspiration.
  • Why it’s important to seek opportunities where others do not.
  • Why it’s important to find people to take the leap with you.
  • How to build partnerships with like-minded people.
  • How to reach out to your community for help.
  • Why you shouldn’t let perfect be the enemy of good.
  • How to embrace failure.
  • How to fake it till you become it.

Links and Resources

  • Episode 1, The Business of Music Therapy with Kat Fulton.
  • Episode 2, Immersive Theater with the Speakeasy Society.
  • Episode 3, The Figment Project with David Koren.
  • Episode 4, Saga Fest with Scott Shigeoka.
  • Episode 5, Music Teacher’s Helper with Brandon Pearce.
  • Episode 6, Intellectual Property and Contract Law with Danielle Fredericks.
  • Episode 7, Innovation Matters with Tim Cynova.
  • Episode 8, 5 Steps to Success with David Cutler.
  • Episode 9, Life & Work Hacks with Luke Haynes.

$5k to Keep Arts Entrepreneurs Going!

Before You Go

As I mentioned in the show, I’d love to have your feedback on this episode. Were these ten lessons helpful to you? Please let me know in the comments section below.

And if you’re interested in supporting the future of this show, please consider contributing to our crowdfunding campaign (through April 17, 2015). Thanks!

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Image: Philip Graulty / Arts Entrepreneurs

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/ten-lessons-ten-guests/feed/ 1 I started this podcast because I wanted to pick the brains of people who I admire -- artists who are out there doing remarkable things. And over the past nine episodes, I have learned so much from the stories and lessons that my guests have shared. I started this podcast because I wanted to pick the brains of people who I admire -- artists who are out there doing remarkable things. And over the past nine episodes, I have learned so much from the stories and lessons that my guests have shared. Collectively, they've shifted the way I approach entrepreneurship, leadership, and my own artistic practice. And so on today's episode, I reflect on the ten lessons I've learned from my first ten guests. Enjoy! In This Episode, You’ll Learn… * How to prioritize success. * How to find the sweet spot between your own passions and other people's needs. * Why it's important to look outside of your industry for inspiration. * Why it's important to seek opportunities where others do not. * Why it's important to find people to take the leap with you. * How to build partnerships with like-minded people. * How to reach out to your community for help. * Why you shouldn't let perfect be the enemy of good. * How to embrace failure. * How to fake it till you become it. Links and Resources * Episode 1 (/music-therapy-business-with-kat-fulton/), The Business of Music Therapy with Kat Fulton. * Episode 2 (/immersive-theater-with-speakeasy-society/), Immersive Theater with the Speakeasy Society. * Episode 3 (/figment-nyc-with-david-koren/), The Figment Project with David Koren. * Episode 4 (/saga-fest-iceland-with-scott-shigeoka/), Saga Fest with Scott Shigeoka. * Episode 5 (/music-teachers-helper-with-brandon-pearce/), Music Teacher's Helper with Brandon Pearce. * Episode 6 (/intellectual-property-and-contract-law-with-danielle-fredericks/), Intellectual Property and Contract Law with Danielle Fredericks. * Episode 7 (/innovation-matters-tim-cynova-of-fractured-atlas/), Innovation Matters with Tim Cynova. * Episode 8 (/from-starving-artist-to-arts-entrepreneur-5-steps-to-success-with-david-cutler/), 5 Steps to Success with David Cutler. * Episode 9 (/work-life-hacks-with-quilter-luke-haynes/), Life & Work Hacks with Luke Haynes. $5k to Keep Arts Entrepreneurs Going! Before You Go As I mentioned in the show, I'd love to have your feedback on this episode. Were these ten lessons helpful to you? Please let me know in the comments section below. And if you're interested in supporting the future of this show, please consider contributing to our crowdfunding campaign (/support) (through April 17, 2015). Thanks! ### Image: Philip Graulty / Arts Entrepreneurs (/contact) Philip Graulty clean 38:53
Work & Life Hacks with Quilter Luke Haynes /work-life-hacks-with-quilter-luke-haynes/ /work-life-hacks-with-quilter-luke-haynes/#comments Thu, 19 Mar 2015 09:20:21 +0000 /?p=972 We are now one week into our crowdfunding campaign and so far, the response has been incredible! Thank you to everyone who has invested in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs by making a contribution, sharing the campaign across social media, and simply reaching out to let me know that you believe in this show!

If you are interested in donating a few bucks to show your support — or a few hundred bucks to sponsor an episode or two — head on over to artsentrepreneurs.com/support.

As excited as I am about the crowdfunding campaign, I am equally excited for today’s guest.

Luke Haynes is a quilter and fabric artist whose work is informed by a background in architecture and design. Luke’s innovative approach to the medium has landed his quilts in museums and shows across the country. His work is currently in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum and the Headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, but his success isn’t without hard work and sacrifice.

Today, Luke shares how he got his start on a llama ranch in central Oregon, how he managed to get his personal quilt into the Brooklyn Museum, and how he strikes a work-life balance amongst all of his projects.

luke-haynes-quilt

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How Luke stumbled upon quilting from a background in fine arts and architecture.
  • How Luke managed to get the quilt on his own bed into the Brooklyn Museum.
  • The importance of defining your priorities and pursuing them.
  • How working on a llama ranch in central Oregon enabled Luke to pursue his art full-time.
  • Why it’s important to distinguish between wanting and needing to be an artist.
  • The importance of reaching out to your community for help.
  • Why Luke continues to barter and trade, despite his success.
  • The importance of making yourself accessible online and offline.
  • How Luke balances business and artistic practice.
  • The tools and techniques Luke uses to stay productive.
  • Why it’s important to define your workspace.
  • Luke’s advice for artists who struggle with work/life balance.

Links and Resources

Luke Haynes

My Trello Task List for This Episode

trello-luke-haynes

Before You Go

What tools do you use to stay productive? Do you have any tips on work-life balance? Please share your thoughts in the comments section.

And if you have a moment, head on over to iTunes and leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact page. Thanks!

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Image: Luke Haynes

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/work-life-hacks-with-quilter-luke-haynes/feed/ 8 We are now one week into our crowdfunding campaign and so far, the response has been incredible! Thank you to everyone who has invested in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs by making a contribution, sharing the campaign across social media, We are now one week into our crowdfunding campaign and so far, the response has been incredible! Thank you to everyone who has invested in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs by making a contribution, sharing the campaign across social media, and simply reaching out to let me know that you believe in this show! If you are interested in donating a few bucks to show your support -- or a few hundred bucks to sponsor an episode or two -- head on over to artsentrepreneurs.com/support (/support). As excited as I am about the crowdfunding campaign, I am equally excited for today's guest. Luke Haynes (http://www.lukehaynes.com) is a quilter and fabric artist whose work is informed by a background in architecture and design. Luke's innovative approach to the medium has landed his quilts in museums and shows across the country. His work is currently in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum and the Headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, but his success isn't without hard work and sacrifice. Today, Luke shares how he got his start on a llama ranch in central Oregon, how he managed to get his personal quilt into the Brooklyn Museum, and how he strikes a work-life balance amongst all of his projects. (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/luke-haynes-quilt.jpg) In This Episode, You'll Learn... How Luke stumbled upon quilting from a background in fine arts and architecture. How Luke managed to get the quilt on his own bed into the Brooklyn Museum. The importance of defining your priorities and pursuing them. How working on a llama ranch in central Oregon enabled Luke to pursue his art full-time. Why it's important to distinguish between wanting and needing to be an artist. The importance of reaching out to your community for help. Why Luke continues to barter and trade, despite his success. The importance of making yourself accessible online and offline. How Luke balances business and artistic practice. The tools and techniques Luke uses to stay productive. Why it's important to define your workspace. Luke's advice for artists who struggle with work/life balance. Links and Resources Luke Haynes (http://lukehaynes.com/) (Facebook (http://facebook.com/lukequilts), Instagram (http://instagram.com/entropies), Twitter (http://twitter.com/lukehaynescom)). Trello (/trello), "the free, easy and visual way to organize anything with anyone." Brandon Mayer (http://www.brandonmayer.com/), The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers. Luke Haynes My Trello Task List for This Episode (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/trello-luke-haynes.jpg) Before You Go What tools do you use to stay productive? Do you have any tips on work-life balance? Please share your thoughts in the comments section. And if you have a moment, head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) and leave an honest review -- I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact (/contact) page. Thanks! ### Image: Luke Haynes (http://www.lukehaynes.com) Philip Graulty clean 41:23
From Starving Artist to Arts Entrepreneur: 5 Steps to Success with David Cutler /from-starving-artist-to-arts-entrepreneur-5-steps-to-success-with-david-cutler/ /from-starving-artist-to-arts-entrepreneur-5-steps-to-success-with-david-cutler/#comments Thu, 12 Mar 2015 09:53:02 +0000 /?p=949

Hey everyone! Before you listen to today’s show, I have a quick favor to ask: Arts Entrepreneurs launched its first crowdfunding campaign and it would mean so much to have your support. Here are four easy ways you can do that (two of them don’t involve money):

  • Share this podcast and website with your network of artists.
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes.
  • Share the campaign with people who can invest in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs.
  • Invest in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs yourself!

My goal with this campaign is to raise $5,000 to:

  • Offset some of my fixed costs (web hosting, podcast hosting, apps).
  • Invest in better equipment so I can produce more episodes at a higher quality.
  • Build a team of contributors who can write informative and inspiring articles.

View the crowdfunding campaign and watch my 3-minute video pitch.

Thank you all so much!

Today’s guest is David Cutler. David balances a varied career as a jazz and classical composer, pianist, educator, author, blogger, consultant, speaker, advocate and entrepreneur among other things. His book The Savvy Musician: Building a Career, Earning a Living, & Making a Difference was heralded by Jeffrey Zeigler of the Kronos Quartet as “Hands down, the most valuable resource available for aspiring musicians.”

And over the past few years, he’s taken the principles and methods outlined in his book and applied them to The Savvy Musician in Action, an intensive, experiential 5-day workshop designed to help arts entrepreneurs increase income and impact. The workshop takes place every summer at the University of South Carolina where David teaches and directs Music Entrepreneurship.

He’s got a lot to share so be sure to take notes. Enjoy!

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How an inherent need to be creative led David to find his voice in jazz and classical piano.
  • Why graduating from the top music schools wasn’t enough for David to obtain success as a pianist.
  • Why earning a Master’s degree was a moment of crisis, not celebration.
  • How David managed to build a career off of the skills he learned as a musician.
  • David’s “i3″ formula for success — inspiration, income and impact.
  • David’s five-step plan to becoming an arts entrepreneur.
  • The importance of prioritization and planning.
  • How to approach the topic of money and compensation as an artist.
  • How to create new opportunities in a culture of scarcity.
  • What a powerhouse topic is (and why you need one).
  • Why it’s important to always considering your audience/customers.
  • What Savvy Musician in Action is all about.
  • What David feels the world desperately needs — creative leaders who can find new opportunities where others do not.

Links and Resources

Before You Go

Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please consider making a contribution at: artsentrepreneurs.com/support.

Thanks again to David Cutler for sharing his story with us — and to you for listening!

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Image: David Cutler / Savvy Musician

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/from-starving-artist-to-arts-entrepreneur-5-steps-to-success-with-david-cutler/feed/ 0 Hey everyone! Before you listen to today's show, I have a quick favor to ask: Arts Entrepreneurs launched its first crowdfunding campaign and it would mean so much to have your support. Here are four easy ways you can do that (two of them don't involve... Hey everyone! Before you listen to today's show, I have a quick favor to ask: Arts Entrepreneurs launched its first crowdfunding campaign and it would mean so much to have your support. Here are four easy ways you can do that (two of them don't involve money): * Share this podcast and website with your network of artists. * Leave an honest review on iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6). * Share the campaign (/support) with people who can invest in the future of Arts Entrepreneurs. * Invest in the future (/support) of Arts Entrepreneurs yourself! My goal with this campaign is to raise $5,000 to: * Offset some of my fixed costs (web hosting, podcast hosting, apps). * Invest in better equipment so I can produce more episodes at a higher quality. * Build a team of contributors who can write informative and inspiring articles. View the crowdfunding campaign and watch my 3-minute video pitch (/support). Thank you all so much! Today's guest is David Cutler. David balances a varied career as a jazz and classical composer, pianist, educator, author, blogger, consultant, speaker, advocate and entrepreneur among other things. His book The Savvy Musician: Building a Career, Earning a Living, & Making a Difference was heralded by Jeffrey Zeigler of the Kronos Quartet as "Hands down, the most valuable resource available for aspiring musicians." And over the past few years, he's taken the principles and methods outlined in his book and applied them to The Savvy Musician in Action (http://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/music/spark_laboratory/retreat/index.php), an intensive, experiential 5-day workshop designed to help arts entrepreneurs increase income and impact. The workshop takes place every summer at the University of South Carolina where David teaches and directs Music Entrepreneurship. He's got a lot to share so be sure to take notes. Enjoy! In This Episode, You'll Learn... How an inherent need to be creative led David to find his voice in jazz and classical piano. Why graduating from the top music schools wasn't enough for David to obtain success as a pianist. Why earning a Master's degree was a moment of crisis, not celebration. How David managed to build a career off of the skills he learned as a musician. David's "i3" formula for success -- inspiration, income and impact. David's five-step plan to becoming an arts entrepreneur. The importance of prioritization and planning. How to approach the topic of money and compensation as an artist. How to create new opportunities in a culture of scarcity. What a powerhouse topic is (and why you need one). Why it's important to always considering your audience/customers. What Savvy Musician in Action is all about. What David feels the world desperately needs -- creative leaders who can find new opportunities where others do not. Links and Resources The Savvy Musician in Action (http://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/music/spark_laboratory/retreat/index.php), an intensive, experiential 5-day workshop for arts entrepreneurs. The Savvy Musician (http://www.savvymusician.com), David's highly-praised book. Spark Laboratory (http://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/music/spark_laboratory/index.php), University of South Carolina's music leadership laboratory. Brandon Mayer (http://www.brandonmayer.com/), The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers. Before You Go Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please consider making a contribution at: artsentrepreneurs.com/support (/support). Thanks again to David Cutler for sharing his story with us — and to you for listening! ### Image: David Cutler / Savvy Musician (http://savvymusician.com/) Philip Graulty clean 40:34
Innovation Matters: A Conversation with Tim Cynova of Fractured Atlas /innovation-matters-tim-cynova-of-fractured-atlas/ /innovation-matters-tim-cynova-of-fractured-atlas/#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 09:51:43 +0000 /?p=937 I have some great news to share: This tiny podcast, which I produce out of my parents’ garage, has surpassed 1,000 downloads! That may not seem like a lot (and maybe it isn’t), but I’m pretty excited about it. At this point, it means that I’m reaching people outside of my own network, which is just amazing, so thank you so much for your support!

If you recall, last week we spoke with Danielle Fredericks, an LA-based attorney who helps independent artists with all of their legal concerns: contracts, copyrights, trademarks, etc.

But where do you turn if you want to apply for a grant, but don’t have non-profit status? Where do you get liability insurance for your next film production? How do you find rehearsal space for your dance company?

There are many support organizations around the U.S. who provide such services specifically for artists, but today, we’re going to hear from Tim Cynova, Deputy Director at Fractured Atlasthe nation’s largest arts service and advocacy organization. In this episode, Tim and I discuss arts management, entrepreneurship and the importance of innovation.

tim-cynova

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How Tim got his start in arts management.
  • Why Tim decided to give up the trombone and fundraise for a modern dance company instead.
  • What attracted Tim to arts management in the first place and why he loves it so much.
  • How Fractured Atlas is helping artists overcome the challenges they face.
  • What Fractured Atlas is doing to acknowledge arts entrepreneurs.
  • The importance of innovation and looking outside your industry for inspiration.
  • Tim’s advice for artists and arts entrepreneurs: “Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good.”
  • Why it’s important to have mentors who speak the truth.

Links and Resources

  • Fractured Atlas, a support organization that “empowers artists to succeed as entrepreneurs.”
  • #SKYNOVA, “the only internet TV show featuring Culture Warriors in their native habitat.”
  • University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music, where Tim got his start in arts management.
  • Parsons Dance Company, the modern dance company that inspired Tim to move to New York.
  • Arts Entrepreneurship Awards, Fractured Atlas’ new initiative that celebrates innovation in the arts.
  • Laundromat Project, “socially relevant and socially engaged art, artists, and arts programming in laundromats and other everyday spaces.”
  • OnTheBoards.tv, “a website that delivers full-length, high quality contemporary performance films to your TV, desktop or mobile device.”
  • Groupmuse, “half party, half chamber music concerts, in homes around the world.”
  • BURN, “one of the largest films funded entirely by charitable donations and no investors.”
  • Brandon Mayer, The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers.

Before You Go

Why do you think so many artists struggle to make it? Do you think art schools and conservatories are to blame? What are some of the ways you innovative or adapt your artistic practice to technology? Please share your stories and thoughts in the comments section. Or, just say hello. I’d love to hear from you!

Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact page. Thanks!

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Image: Philip Graulty / Arts Entrepreneurs

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/innovation-matters-tim-cynova-of-fractured-atlas/feed/ 1 I have some great news to share: This tiny podcast, which I produce out of my parents' garage, has surpassed 1,000 downloads! That may not seem like a lot (and maybe it isn't), but I'm pretty excited about it. At this point, I have some great news to share: This tiny podcast, which I produce out of my parents' garage, has surpassed 1,000 downloads! That may not seem like a lot (and maybe it isn't), but I'm pretty excited about it. At this point, it means that I'm reaching ... Philip Graulty clean
Intellectual Property and Contract Law with Danielle Fredericks /intellectual-property-and-contract-law-with-danielle-fredericks/ /intellectual-property-and-contract-law-with-danielle-fredericks/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:00:48 +0000 /?p=917 Today’s guest is Danielle Fredericks, a Los Angeles-based attorney who provides legal services and education to independent artists and businesses through her firm ArtVenture Law. If you’re unsure of how to protect your artwork and yourself, you’ll definitely want to hear what she has to say.

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • What Danielle did to survive the rigors of law school.
  • Why every artist should have a contract (that means YOU).
  • The benefits of licensing vs. selling your art work.
  • What licensing agreements and copyright laws mean for DJs who sample music.
  • How to protect your intellectual property on the Internet.
  • How to balance exposure of your artwork vs. risk of copyright infringement.
  • The benefits of Creative Commons.
  • The differences between copyrights and trademarks.
  • Danielle’s tips for creating paper trails to prove a copyright (and whether placing the “©” symbol on your work actually means anything).
  • When you know its time to get a trademark for your brand or product.
  • Why Danielle waited to trademark her business name.
  • If owning a domain name is enough to protect your brand.
  • Which business entities are best for independent artists.
  • The first step every artist should take to protect themselves and their work.
  • Danielle’s recommendations for affordable legal advice.

Links and Resources

  • ArtVenture Law, the law offices of Danielle Fredericks.
  • Trade School, a community organization that offers classes using barter instead of money.
  • Creative Commons, “helping you share your knowledge and creativity with the world.”
  • California Lawyers for the Arts, a network of lawyers that empowers the creative community by providing education, representation and dispute resolution.

Before You Go

Have you ever had your intellectual property stolen? Or been the victim of copyright infringement? If so, how did you handle it? Please share your story – and the lessons you learned – in the comments section.

And if you have a moment, head on over to iTunes and leave an honest review – I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact page. Thanks!

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Image: Philip Graulty / Arts Entrepreneurs

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/intellectual-property-and-contract-law-with-danielle-fredericks/feed/ 4 Today's guest is Danielle Fredericks, a Los Angeles-based attorney who provides legal services and education to independent artists and businesses through her firm ArtVenture Law. If you're unsure of how to protect your artwork and yourself, Today's guest is Danielle Fredericks, a Los Angeles-based attorney who provides legal services and education to independent artists and businesses through her firm ArtVenture Law (http://www.artventurelaw.com). If you're unsure of how to protect your artwork and yourself, you'll definitely want to hear what she has to say. In This Episode, You’ll Learn… What Danielle did to survive the rigors of law school. Why every artist should have a contract (that means YOU). The benefits of licensing vs. selling your art work. What licensing agreements and copyright laws mean for DJs who sample music. How to protect your intellectual property on the Internet. How to balance exposure of your artwork vs. risk of copyright infringement. The benefits of Creative Commons. The differences between copyrights and trademarks. Danielle's tips for creating paper trails to prove a copyright (and whether placing the "©" symbol on your work actually means anything). When you know its time to get a trademark for your brand or product. Why Danielle waited to trademark her business name. If owning a domain name is enough to protect your brand. Which business entities are best for independent artists. The first step every artist should take to protect themselves and their work. Danielle's recommendations for affordable legal advice. Links and Resources * ArtVenture Law (http://www.artventurelaw.com/), the law offices of Danielle Fredericks. * Trade School (http://tradeschool.coop/losangeles/), a community organization that offers classes using barter instead of money. * Creative Commons (http://creativecommons.org/), "helping you share your knowledge and creativity with the world." * California Lawyers for the Arts (http://www.calawyersforthearts.org/), a network of lawyers that empowers the creative community by providing education, representation and dispute resolution. Before You Go Have you ever had your intellectual property stolen? Or been the victim of copyright infringement? If so, how did you handle it? Please share your story – and the lessons you learned – in the comments section. And if you have a moment, head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) and leave an honest review – I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact (/contact) page. Thanks! ### Image: Philip Graulty / Arts Entrepreneurs (/about/) Philip Graulty clean 43:11
From Passions to Profits: Music Teacher’s Helper with Brandon Pearce /music-teachers-helper-with-brandon-pearce/ /music-teachers-helper-with-brandon-pearce/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 08:00:56 +0000 /?p=879 Today, we’re traveling to Bali, Indonesia to chat with Brandon Pearce, a piano teacher turned computer programmer turned entrepreneur.

Brandon is the creator and owner of Music Teacher’s Helper, a web-based software management system that helps music teachers run their own music studios.

Brandon started out by building Music Teacher’s Helper for his own needs, but after realizing that there was a market for his software, he gave up teaching piano, quit his day job in tech support, and built an entire business around it.

Over the past eleven years, he has grown his company to the point where he and his family now have the freedom to live and travel anywhere in the world. And today, he shares with us how he managed to do that.

…Where passion or skill meets usefulness, a microbusiness built on freedom and value can thrive. — Chris Guillebeau

It’s an incredible story, but before you click play, I want to apologize up front for the audio quality. Our Skype connection was faulty and as a result, some of the interview was lost and other parts are difficult to understand, but I hope you’ll bare with it because what Brandon has to say about balancing business, passions, happiness and family is well worth hearing.

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How Brandon combined his passions for music and computers into a thriving business.
  • Why Brandon decided to quit his job and pursue Music Teacher’s Helper full-time.
  • How Brandon managed to get his first customers.
  • The importance of getting user feedback early on (and often).
  • Brandon’s number one source for new customers.
  • How Brandon ended up scaling his business to the point where he could travel the world.
  • The importance of letting go and not micro-managing your team.
  • What happiness means to Brandon.
  • Brandon’s advice for first-time entrepreneurs.

Links and Resources

  • $100 Startup, Chris Guillebeau’s New York Times best-selling book.
  • Music Teacher’s Helper, receive 20% off your first month.
  • Studio Helper, Brandon’s web-based management software for studio’s with multiple teachers.
  • Groove Piano, Brandon’s latest venture, a carry-on friendly digital piano.
  • Pearce on Earth, Brandon’s personal blog about business, travel and lifestyle.

Before You Go

Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page.

And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes and leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact page. Thanks!

###

Image: Brandon Pearce / Pearce on Earth

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/music-teachers-helper-with-brandon-pearce/feed/ 1 Today, we're traveling to Bali, Indonesia to chat with Brandon Pearce, a piano teacher turned computer programmer turned entrepreneur. - Brandon is the creator and owner of Music Teacher's Helper, a web-based software management system that helps musi... Today, we're traveling to Bali, Indonesia to chat with Brandon Pearce, a piano teacher turned computer programmer turned entrepreneur. Brandon is the creator and owner of Music Teacher's Helper (/musicteachershelper), a web-based software management system that helps music teachers run their own music studios. Brandon started out by building Music Teacher's Helper for his own needs, but after realizing that there was a market for his software, he gave up teaching piano, quit his day job in tech support, and built an entire business around it. Over the past eleven years, he has grown his company to the point where he and his family now have the freedom to live and travel anywhere in the world. And today, he shares with us how he managed to do that. ...Where passion or skill meets usefulness, a microbusiness built on freedom and value can thrive. -- Chris Guillebeau It's an incredible story, but before you click play, I want to apologize up front for the audio quality. Our Skype connection was faulty and as a result, some of the interview was lost and other parts are difficult to understand, but I hope you'll bare with it because what Brandon has to say about balancing business, passions, happiness and family is well worth hearing. In This Episode, You'll Learn... How Brandon combined his passions for music and computers into a thriving business. Why Brandon decided to quit his job and pursue Music Teacher's Helper full-time. How Brandon managed to get his first customers. The importance of getting user feedback early on (and often). Brandon's number one source for new customers. How Brandon ended up scaling his business to the point where he could travel the world. The importance of letting go and not micro-managing your team. What happiness means to Brandon. Brandon's advice for first-time entrepreneurs. Links and Resources $100 Startup (/100startup), Chris Guillebeau's New York Times best-selling book. Music Teacher's Helper (/musicteachershelper), receive 20% off your first month. Studio Helper (http://www.studiohelper.com), Brandon's web-based management software for studio's with multiple teachers. Groove Piano (http://groovepiano.com/), Brandon's latest venture, a carry-on friendly digital piano. Pearce on Earth (http://www.pearceonearth.com), Brandon's personal blog about business, travel and lifestyle. Before You Go Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) and leave an honest review -- I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. Lastly, if you know of someone that you’d like featured on the show (maybe even yourself), please send me a message on my contact (/contact) page. Thanks! ### Image: Brandon Pearce / Pearce on Earth (http://pearceonearth.com/) Philip Graulty clean 35:51
Leaps of Faith: Saga Fest Iceland with Scott Shigeoka /saga-fest-iceland-with-scott-shigeoka/ /saga-fest-iceland-with-scott-shigeoka/#comments Thu, 12 Feb 2015 08:00:27 +0000 /?p=783 Today’s episode is a continuation of last week’s conversations about festival startups. In Episode #3, we heard from David Koren, the Executive Producer of FIGMENT, a participatory arts festival that has been going strong in New York and around the U.S. since 2007. And now, we’re going to hear from an arts entrepreneur who’s journey as a festival producer has just begun.

Scott Shigeoka is a music journalist and multimedia storyteller who recently quit his job in Washington, D.C. to move to Reykjavik, Iceland and launch Saga Fest, a participatory arts festival that uses music and storytelling to connect people to each other and the planet.

In a little over six months, Scott has managed to turn his dream into a full-fledged reality. He’s assembled a team, built partnerships, and inspired an entire community — all in a country he previously knew nothing about.

Scott and I first met in July 2014 thanks to the National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellowship, a six-month fellowship program for arts entrepreneurs. I can say with all honesty that he is one of the most inspiring people I know and you’re about to find out why!

Note: I accidentally referred to 2013 twice in this episode when I meant 2014.

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How an experience in the deserts of Jordan inspired Scott to start a festival in Iceland.
  • How two fellowship programs empowered Scott to take one giant leap of faith.
  • The importance of letting go and trusting your team (and the universe).
  • Scott’s recipe for leadership — vulnerability, passion and authenticity.
  • How Saga Fest uses storytelling and music to connect people to each other and the planet.
  • How you can become an artist-in-residence at Saga Fest.
  • Scott’s advice for artists who dream big, but are constrained by reality.
  • The importance of listening to your intuition.

Links and Resources

Traveling by Mule to a Desert Cave in Jordan

Saga Fest Iceland

Before You Go

Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page.

And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes and leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other arts entrepreneurs to find and benefit from it.

Last but not least, what do you think of Scott’s story?

Have you ever been inspired to take a leap of faith? What makes a great leader in your book? What role does community play in the work you do? I’d love to hear your thoughts. Please chime in below.

###

Image: Scott Shigeoka / Saga Fest

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/saga-fest-iceland-with-scott-shigeoka/feed/ 3 Today's episode is a continuation of last week's conversations about festival startups. In Episode #3, we heard from David Koren, the Executive Producer of FIGMENT, a participatory arts festival that has been going strong in New York and around the U.S. Today's episode is a continuation of last week's conversations about festival startups. In Episode #3 (/figment-nyc-with-david-koren/), we heard from David Koren, the Executive Producer of FIGMENT, a participatory arts festival that has been going strong in New York and around the U.S. since 2007. And now, we're going to hear from an arts entrepreneur who's journey as a festival producer has just begun. Scott Shigeoka is a music journalist and multimedia storyteller who recently quit his job in Washington, D.C. to move to Reykjavik, Iceland and launch Saga Fest (http://www.sagafest.is), a participatory arts festival that uses music and storytelling to connect people to each other and the planet. In a little over six months, Scott has managed to turn his dream into a full-fledged reality. He's assembled a team, built partnerships, and inspired an entire community -- all in a country he previously knew nothing about. Scott and I first met in July 2014 thanks to the National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellowship (http://www.artstrategies.org/programs/creative_community_fellows/program/), a six-month fellowship program for arts entrepreneurs. I can say with all honesty that he is one of the most inspiring people I know and you're about to find out why! Note: I accidentally referred to 2013 twice in this episode when I meant 2014. In This Episode, You'll Learn... * How an experience in the deserts of Jordan inspired Scott to start a festival in Iceland. * How two fellowship programs empowered Scott to take one giant leap of faith. * The importance of letting go and trusting your team (and the universe). * Scott's recipe for leadership -- vulnerability, passion and authenticity. * How Saga Fest uses storytelling and music to connect people to each other and the planet. * How you can become an artist-in-residence at Saga Fest. * Scott's advice for artists who dream big, but are constrained by reality. * The importance of listening to your intuition. Links and Resources * Taking the Leap (https://medium.com/@scottshigeoka/taking-the-leap-34074661c688), Scott's blog post about that pivotal moment in the deserts of Jordan. * Fulbright-mtvU (http://fulbright.mtvu.com/), the grant Scott received for his work with Saga Fest. * National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellows (http://www.artstrategies.org/programs/creative_community_fellows/program/), the fellowship where Scott and I first met. * Saga Fest (http://www.sagafest.is/), a music and arts festival in Iceland, May 23-24, 2015. * Saga Fest Artist Residency (https://sagaresidency.wufoo.com/forms/saga-fest-artist-residency-application/), Saga Fest's one-week artist residency program. * Kira Kira (http://kirakira.bandcamp.com/), the music of Saga Fest artist Kristin Björk Kristjansdottir. Traveling by Mule to a Desert Cave in Jordan (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/saga-fest-logo.jpg) Before You Go Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) and leave an honest review -- I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other arts entrepreneurs to find and benefit from it. Last but not least, what do you think of Scott's story? Have you ever been inspired to take a leap of faith? What makes a great leader in your book? What role does community play in the work you do? I'd love to hear your thoughts. Please chime in below. ### Image: Scott Shigeoka / Saga Fest (http://www.sagafest.is/) Philip Graulty clean
How to Start a Festival: Figment NYC with David Koren /figment-nyc-with-david-koren/ /figment-nyc-with-david-koren/#comments Thu, 05 Feb 2015 08:00:43 +0000 /?p=733 One of the reasons I love this podcast so much is that we get to take an in-depth look at the business of art in different fields. And the reason I chose to go this route as opposed to focusing solely on one discipline (i.e. music, theater, etc.) is because I believe that regardless of discipline, most artists face the same challenges.

My hope is that by interviewing artists and entrepreneurs working across all disciplines, we can open up the conversation, learn from one another, and uncover unique solutions to our problems.

For the next two episodes, we’ll be talking with two arts entrepreneurs who are using participatory art — an approach to making art in which the audience is engaged directly in the creative process — to build community: David Koren and Scott Shigeoka.

Today’s guest is David Koren, the Executive Producer of FIGMENT — a free, annual, participatory arts festival that began in New York in 2007 and has since expanded to twelve cities across the world.

FIGMENT catalyzes and celebrates an abundance of creativity and passion, challenging artists and our communities to find new ways to create, share, think, and dream. — Figment

What fascinates me most about FIGMENT is that it’s a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization and David himself is a volunteer executive producer. So how do they manage to do what they do? Let’s find out!

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How an experience at Burning Man planted the seeds for FIGMENT.
  • The value of participation when it comes to building community through the arts.
  • How FIGMENT helped New York City’s Governors Island transition into a public park.
  • The importance of having a shared mission among partners and stakeholders.
  • How money fits into the equation of a free, volunteer-driven festival.
  • Why David Koren has chosen to be a volunteer Executive Producer.
  • How FIGMENT is managing to scale worldwide while maintaining its core principles.
  • The value of insurance (and a good lawyer).
  • David’s advice for first-time festival and event producers.

Links and Resources

  • FIGMENT, a free, inclusive, participatory arts event held in multiple cities.
  • Governors Island, the home to FIGMENT NYC.
  • ALPHA, an annual camping event and retreat for artists and creatives.
  • Flickr, FIGMENT’s archive of photos from past events.
  • Brandon Mayer, The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers.

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Before You Go

Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page.

And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes and leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

Lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone that you’d like featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact page.

Thanks again to David for sharing his story with us — and to you for listening!

###

Images: Anthony Collins / Figment Project

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/figment-nyc-with-david-koren/feed/ 2 One of the reasons I love this podcast so much is that we get to take an in-depth look at the business of art in different fields. And the reason I chose to go this route as opposed to focusing solely on one discipline (i.e. music, theater, etc. One of the reasons I love this podcast so much is that we get to take an in-depth look at the business of art in different fields. And the reason I chose to go this route as opposed to focusing solely on one discipline (i.e. music, theater, etc.) is because I believe that regardless of discipline, most artists face the same challenges. My hope is that by interviewing artists and entrepreneurs working across all disciplines, we can open up the conversation, learn from one another, and uncover unique solutions to our problems. For the next two episodes, we'll be talking with two arts entrepreneurs who are using participatory art (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Participatory_art) -- an approach to making art in which the audience is engaged directly in the creative process -- to build community: David Koren and Scott Shigeoka (/saga-fest-iceland-with-scott-shigeoka/). Today's guest is David Koren, the Executive Producer of FIGMENT -- a free, annual, participatory arts festival that began in New York in 2007 and has since expanded to twelve cities across the world. FIGMENT catalyzes and celebrates an abundance of creativity and passion, challenging artists and our communities to find new ways to create, share, think, and dream. -- Figment What fascinates me most about FIGMENT is that it's a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization and David himself is a volunteer executive producer. So how do they manage to do what they do? Let's find out! In This Episode, You'll Learn... How an experience at Burning Man planted the seeds for FIGMENT. The value of participation when it comes to building community through the arts. How FIGMENT helped New York City's Governors Island transition into a public park. The importance of having a shared mission among partners and stakeholders. How money fits into the equation of a free, volunteer-driven festival. Why David Koren has chosen to be a volunteer Executive Producer. How FIGMENT is managing to scale worldwide while maintaining its core principles. The value of insurance (and a good lawyer). David's advice for first-time festival and event producers. Links and Resources FIGMENT (http://www.figmentproject.org/), a free, inclusive, participatory arts event held in multiple cities. Governors Island (http://www.govisland.com/), the home to FIGMENT NYC. ALPHA (http://alpha.figmentart.org/), an annual camping event and retreat for artists and creatives. Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/figmentproject/), FIGMENT's archive of photos from past events. Brandon Mayer (http://www.brandonmayer.com/), The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers. (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/AWC_1590.jpg) (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/AWC_1712.jpg) (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/AWC_1430.jpg) (/dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/AWC_1723.jpg) Before You Go Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. And if you have a moment, please head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) and leave an honest review -- I’d love to hear what you think. The more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. Lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone that you’d like featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact (/contact) page. Thanks again to David for sharing his story with us -- and to you for listening! ### Images: Anthony Collins / Figment Project (https://www.flickr.com/photos/figmentproject/) Philip Graulty clean 43:05
From Bathrooms to Breweries: Immersive Theater with The Speakeasy Society /immersive-theater-with-speakeasy-society/ /immersive-theater-with-speakeasy-society/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:00:09 +0000 /?p=643 Today’s guests are Genevieve Gearhart and Matthew Bamberg-Johnson, two of the three co-artistic directors from The Speakeasy Society, a Los Angeles-based theater company dedicated to creating innovative, site-specific, theatrical events.

Over the holidays, I was fortunate to stumble into one of their hallmark performances — a twisted adaptation of the classic Dickens tale, Ebenezer, which took place at Golden Road Brewing in L.A.’s Atwater Village.

Although Speakeasy has only been around for a few years, they’ve managed to build a strong reputation and audience around a specific niche in L.A.’s theater community. From experiential programming to interactive performances to cross-sector partnerships, there’s a lot to learn from Speakeasy’s innovative approach to immersive theater.

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • How The Speakeasy Society is changing the landscape of theater through immersive performances.
  • How they got their start performing in bathroom stalls at CalArts.
  • Why identifying and serving a niche is crucial to building an audience.
  • How a mutually-beneficial partnership with a brewery led to a sold-out run.
  • How Speakeasy manages to function with three co-artistic directors.
  • Genevieve’s and Matthew’s advice for newly-formed companies and solo artists.

Links and Resources

Ebenezer at the Golden Road Brewery (Trailer)

Thanks for Listening!

Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page.

Additionally, please head on over to iTunes to leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. Plus, the more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

And lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone you’d like to be featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact page.

Thanks again to Genevieve and Matthew for sharing their story with us — and to you for listening!

###

Image: Matthew Bamberg-Johnson / Speakeasy Society

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/immersive-theater-with-speakeasy-society/feed/ 1 Today's guests are Genevieve Gearhart and Matthew Bamberg-Johnson, two of the three co-artistic directors from The Speakeasy Society, a Los Angeles-based theater company dedicated to creating innovative, site-specific, theatrical events. - Today's guests are Genevieve Gearhart and Matthew Bamberg-Johnson, two of the three co-artistic directors from The Speakeasy Society (http://speakeasysociety.com/), a Los Angeles-based theater company dedicated to creating innovative, site-specific, theatrical events. Over the holidays, I was fortunate to stumble into one of their hallmark performances -- a twisted adaptation of the classic Dickens tale, Ebenezer, which took place at Golden Road Brewing in L.A.'s Atwater Village. Although Speakeasy has only been around for a few years, they've managed to build a strong reputation and audience around a specific niche in L.A.'s theater community. From experiential programming to interactive performances to cross-sector partnerships, there's a lot to learn from Speakeasy's innovative approach to immersive theater. In This Episode, You’ll Learn… * How The Speakeasy Society is changing the landscape of theater through immersive performances. * How they got their start performing in bathroom stalls at CalArts. * Why identifying and serving a niche is crucial to building an audience. * How a mutually-beneficial partnership with a brewery led to a sold-out run. * How Speakeasy manages to function with three co-artistic directors. * Genevieve's and Matthew's advice for newly-formed companies and solo artists. Links and Resources * Speakeasy Society (http://speakeasysociety.com/) (Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Speakeasy-Society/171659493008602), Instagram (http://instagram.com/thespeakeasysoc), Twitter (http://twitter.com/thespeakeasysoc)). * California Institute for the Arts (http://calarts.edu/) (CalArts). * Golden Road Brewing (http://www.goldenroad.la/pub/), the venue for Speakeasy's Ebenezer. Ebenezer at the Golden Road Brewery (Trailer) Thanks for Listening! Thanks again for listening to the Arts Entrepreneurs podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, please head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) to leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. Plus, the more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. And lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone you’d like to be featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact page (/contact/). Thanks again to Genevieve and Matthew for sharing their story with us — and to you for listening! ### Image: Matthew Bamberg-Johnson / Speakeasy Society (http://speakeasysociety.com/) Philip Graulty clean 42:27
Rhythm for Good! The Business of Music Therapy with Kat Fulton /music-therapy-business-with-kat-fulton/ /music-therapy-business-with-kat-fulton/#comments Sun, 18 Jan 2015 23:59:27 +0000 /?p=471 Facebook, via email, by phone, or in person. Starting a podcast is not easy and your feedback and encouragement played a huge role in getting me here today. So thank you, I appreciate your support!

I am thrilled to introduce you to Kat Fulton, my very first guest! Kat is a music therapist, speaker and music therapy business coach based out of San Diego, CA. She is also the owner of Sound Health Music, an organization that encourages, enables and empowers people to develop their potential through music experiences.

I first discovered Kat in October 2013 when I was just getting started on my entrepreneurial journey. At the time, I was listening to half a dozen podcasts on business, but despite hearing success stories from ordinary people like myself, I wasn’t convinced that I could be one of them — I didn’t think that a classical musician could be a successful entrepreneur.

Well, I was wrong.

When I heard Kat’s story on one of those podcasts, it blew me away. It gave me the confidence I needed to take my first steps in starting my own business. From studying classical piano in college to launching her own music therapy organization, Kat’s journey is full of lessons that every artist can learn from. I hope that after hearing her story, you too will be inspired to believe in yourself and continue forward on your journey.

In This Episode, You’ll Learn…

  • What Kat did when she realized she didn’t want to be a music professor.
  • Why Kat chose to be a music therapist over a classical pianist.
  • Why Kat turned down a job offer to start her own business.
  • How running her own music therapy business literally made Kat sick!
  • How blogging and online business enabled Kat to stop trading her hours for dollars.
  • How experimentation and failure led Kat to one major breakthrough.
  • How Kat is able to create jobs in the music therapy industry.
  • Career advice for college students who are studying music therapy.
  • How being an entrepreneur gives Kat the freedom to practice her art whenever she wants.
  • Kat’s purpose in life.

Links and Resources

The Power of Music, A Short Documentary About Music Therapy

Thanks for Listening!

Thanks again for listening to the first episode of the Arts Entrepreneurs Podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page.

Additionally, please head on over to iTunes to leave an honest review — I’d love to hear what you think. Plus, the more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it.

And lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone you’d like to be featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact page.

Thanks again to Kat for sharing her story with us — and to you for listening!

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Image: Kat Fulton / Sound Health Music

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/music-therapy-business-with-kat-fulton/feed/ 2 The podcast has officially launched! Before you click play, I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who has helped me over the past few weeks on Facebook, via email, by phone, or in person. Starting a podcast is not easy and your feedback and encour... The podcast has officially launched! Before you click play, I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who has helped me over the past few weeks on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/artsentrepreneurs), via email, by phone, or in person. Starting a podcast is not easy and your feedback and encouragement played a huge role in getting me here today. So thank you, I appreciate your support! I am thrilled to introduce you to Kat Fulton, my very first guest! Kat is a music therapist, speaker and music therapy business coach based out of San Diego, CA. She is also the owner of Sound Health Music (http://www.soundhealthmusic.com), an organization that encourages, enables and empowers people to develop their potential through music experiences. I first discovered Kat in October 2013 when I was just getting started on my entrepreneurial journey. At the time, I was listening to half a dozen podcasts on business, but despite hearing success stories from ordinary people like myself, I wasn't convinced that I could be one of them -- I didn't think that a classical musician could be a successful entrepreneur. Well, I was wrong. When I heard Kat’s story on one of those podcasts (http://thefoundation.com/episode16/), it blew me away. It gave me the confidence I needed to take my first steps in starting my own business. From studying classical piano in college to launching her own music therapy organization, Kat's journey is full of lessons that every artist can learn from. I hope that after hearing her story, you too will be inspired to believe in yourself and continue forward on your journey. In This Episode, You'll Learn... What Kat did when she realized she didn't want to be a music professor. Why Kat chose to be a music therapist over a classical pianist. Why Kat turned down a job offer to start her own business. How running her own music therapy business literally made Kat sick! How blogging and online business enabled Kat to stop trading her hours for dollars. How experimentation and failure led Kat to one major breakthrough. How Kat is able to create jobs in the music therapy industry. Career advice for college students who are studying music therapy. How being an entrepreneur gives Kat the freedom to practice her art whenever she wants. Kat's purpose in life. Links and Resources American Music Therapy Association (http://www.musictherapy.org) (AMTA). Rhythm for Good (http://katfulton.com/contact/), Kat's personal blog. Are There Any Music Therapy Jobs Out There? (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMjgTSfmogM) Kat has the answer. Introducing Black Eyed Peas to Boomwhackers (http://katfulton.com/introducing-black-eyed-peas-to-boomwhackers/), Kat's viral music video. Music Therapy Ed (http://www.musictherapyed.com), Kat's on-demand continuing education resource for music therapists. Mindstorm Mondays (http://www.musictherapyed.com/mindstorm-monday/), Kat's weekly webinar series for music therapists. Sound Health Music (http://www.soundhealthmusic.com/), Kat's company website. Brandon Mayer (http://www.brandonmayer.com), The music of Brandon Mayer and the Hidden Powers. The Power of Music, A Short Documentary About Music Therapy Thanks for Listening! Thanks again for listening to the first episode of the Arts Entrepreneurs Podcast! If this show has helped you in any way, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, please head on over to iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arts-entrepreneurs-from-passions/id959435390?mt=2&uo=4&at=11lRY6) to leave an honest review -- I'd love to hear what you think. Plus, the more reviews this podcast has, the better it will rank in iTunes and the easier it will be for other artists to find and benefit from it. And lastly, if you have any questions or know of someone you'd like to be featured on the show, please send me a message on my contact page (/contact/). Philip Graulty clean